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Seaford library opens

Seaford library opens

There’s a new attraction in Seaford that has been getting plenty of attention this week - the library.

Many residents popped along to the Warwick House, Sutton Park Road, building when it opened on Monday to see the dramatic changes brought about with the update.

The library, accessible to all, has a new cafe run by Victoria Young, owner of Front Room in Seaford High Street, and a highly unusual feature for a library - a lovely rooftop garden.

An East Sussex County Council spokesman said: “It’s been very exciting for everyone involved to see the new library open and the first few days have proved very popular with lots of people visiting.

“We’ve received really positive feedback and visitors have been impressed with how bright and spacious the building is, and have said it’s somewhere they can feel comfortable to come to sit and relax.

“People have been very excited about the library and the new cafe and the roof garden also attracted some very positive comments.

“We’d encourage anyone who hasn’t done so already to come down and see what’s on offer – we think they’ll be impressed.”

The library opened at 9.30am on Monday after work on the purpose-built building started last October.

The builiding, that has housed the town’s library since 1946, was closed to the public on August 2 while the transformation took place.

It is part of a £6m development that is the first of its kind in the county, also featuring social care day services and supported living flats.

The changes came about after East Sussex County Council asked residents back in 2009 what they wanted from library services.

The answer was improved layout and design.

Seaford Library is the fourth busiest in the county. During 2007/2008 people made almost 175,000 visits and borrowed 150,000 items.

By sharing facilities, the council said different sections of the community – who might otherwise feel isolated – can come together.

The new day centre for older people will specialise in giving support to both people with dementia, and those who are physically frail.

It will also offer important services to carers, helping you cope with the day-to-day practicalities of looking after someone with a long-term health condition.

Supported living flats will offer adults with a learning disability the chance to have their own place and live independently.

For a video of the library: www.sussexexpress.co.uk

 

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