DCSIMG

Downland track in Glynde restored to former glory

The Dew Pond at Glynde SUS-140314-113014001

The Dew Pond at Glynde SUS-140314-113014001

Local walkers are now able to access an ancient, sunken track running from Glynde up on to the South Downs for the first time in 16 years.

It’s thanks to the work of the South Downs National Park rangers, the South Downs Volunteer Ranger Service and workers from the Glynde Estate.

The 400m track, which probably began life as an old sheep route and then became a major route in the 19th century, took 10 days to clear.

Jan Knowlson, South Downs National Park Ranger, said: “This once popular track was well-used up until the 1990s but then became blocked and overgrown. The banks of this sunken path would once have been covered in wild flowers and we’ve worked closely with the Glynde Estate to restore it to its former glory as a haven for butterflies and other invertebrates. We’re hugely grateful for the support of Lord Hampden, the owner of the Glynde Estate, and all the people who have put so much effort and made such a difference so quickly.”

Walkers on the route can also enjoy the newly-restored dew pond at the top of the path, which has also been cleared by the South Downs Volunteer Ranger Service.

Neville Harrison, a Member of the South Downs National Park Authority and an SDNPA representative on the South Downs Local Access Forum, said: “The footpath at Glynde shows what we can achieve when landowners, volunteers and the South Downs National Park Authority work together – improving access and biodiversity, safeguarding the National Park’s heritage and making people’s experience of the South Downs even better.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page