DCSIMG

Overgrown roadside verges are ‘hazardous’ in some rural Wealden roads

Park Road

Park Road

A resident from Hellingly has said he is concerned some of the roadside grass verges are so overgrown in the area they are obscuring the view of the road and making conditions hazardous for road users.

James Hoad said some of the greenery along the C208, Park Road in Hellingly, B2104, Ersham Road, Hailsham, particularly between Hailsham and Stone Cross, and the A271 was obscuring visibility for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians crossing the road.

Mr Hoad said: “It could be very dangerous.

“I am concerned about the pedestrians crossing the road, and the cyclists because they can’t see.

“You cannot see over the grass verges and it is difficult for cars coming out of junctions. All the signage (on Park Road) is covered over by the high growth.

“The B2104 has lots of bends on it. Some parts of the road are quite zig zaggy and it is so overgrown it is like a tunnel.

“The A22 has been done but the B and C roads, many of them have been left.

“I contacted the council to complain about it two weeks ago and they said they would be sending out contractors but I haven’t seen them.

“It is very dangerous for pedestrians walking because there is no refuge for them to jump in.

“The council have a responsibility to make the environment safe for road users.”

But East Sussex County Council said it does cut the grass twice a year in rural areas. It said it also cuts the grass in urban areas five times a year.

The C208 and the B2104 are due to be cut by July 4, the council said.

Roger Williams, head of highways at East Sussex County Council, said: “The safety of road users is a priority and we have to make sure grass verges are cut at optimum times during the year to ensure every cut makes a difference.

“In East Sussex we cut grass in urban areas five times a year and grass in rural areas twice a year.

“The verge along the A271 was cut on May 14 and the C208 and B2104 are due to be cut by July 4. Both roads are classified as rural roads.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page