First brick laid at Cheneys Lodge in Seaford

First laying of brick in Cheneys development, Seaford.'Front: Paul Newstead (construction manager) and Maureen Hancock'Back: John Freeman, Dave Hill, Mrs B Beall, Barry Smith Martin Burke
First laying of brick in Cheneys development, Seaford.'Front: Paul Newstead (construction manager) and Maureen Hancock'Back: John Freeman, Dave Hill, Mrs B Beall, Barry Smith Martin Burke

The first brick was laid at a new development for older people in Seaford, which replaces a well known nursing home.

Maureen Hancock, who has connections dating back 30 years with the former nursing home on the site, laid the first brick at a gathering on Tuesday 4 June.

The £6m development is being built by not for profit housing association Sussex Housing and Care.

Mrs Hancock said: “I think it’s a wonderful opportunity being able to lay the first brick.

“I was sad to see the old Cheneys nursing home go, it had a wonderful reputation and the staff were fantastic.

“I had many happy years on the Cheneys committee and supporting residents in the home, however we have to move on and the new Cheneys Lodge is the best thing for the local community.

“It’s a beautiful site and with the bus stop right outside I’m excited to learn more about the new apartments.”

A number of voluntary board members from Sussex Housing and Care, as well as the chairman and deputy chair of Seaford Seniors Forum joined Denne the builders and Mrs Hancock at this event.

Chairman of Sussex Housing and Care Dave Hill said: “It’s been a fantastic event and everyone can keep up to date with the progress of the build by viewing photos on the Cheneys lodge website.”

Construction manager from Denne Construction Paul Newstead said: “We are very happy with the way works have progressed to date at Cheneys Lodge.

“This is an important project for Seaford and we are working closely with Sussex Housing and Care and the local community to make it a success.”

Cheneys nursing home was acquired by Sussex Housing & Care in 1946 and opened by Winston Churchill’s wife, Clementine Churchill.

It was decided to redevelop the site because the home was not fit for purpose.

The new 35 apartments on site will enable people to be independent with care available as and when residents need it via a 24 hour care team.