Helping town tackle sewer blockages

Information stand highlighting the fat oil and grease campaign along side a team from Cleaner Seas Please. Pictured are Catherine Bach, Harriet Coombes, Jan Cutting and Amy Bounds. Picture by Nigel Bowles
Information stand highlighting the fat oil and grease campaign along side a team from Cleaner Seas Please. Pictured are Catherine Bach, Harriet Coombes, Jan Cutting and Amy Bounds. Picture by Nigel Bowles
0
Have your say

Southern Water and the Clean Seas Please group are helping people in Hastings to improve bathing water quality in the area.

The two groups set up a stand in Priory Meadow Shopping Centre on November 10 to highlight the problems caused by things like wet wipes and fat, oil and grease.

Wet wipes and other items that are often wrongly flushed away combine with cooking oils inside sewers and cause blockages. This can lead to wastewater backing up into homes or polluting roads and watercourses, which lead to the sea.

Last month, nearly 21 tons of non-biodegradable items had to be removed from the town’s treatment works and so far this year there have been almost 80 fat-related blockages in Hastings.

To highlight the issue, Southern Water and Clean Seas Please are holding a fun day at The Bridge Community Centre in Priory Road from 10.30am to 2.30pm on November 29.

Southern Water is working with the Environment Agency and Hastings Borough Council on other sources of pollution in an attempt to help Hastings meet tough new European standards for bathing water.

Jan Cutting, from Clean Seas Please, said: “While Southern Water, the council and the Environment Agency are working together to try to ensure Hastings meets tougher standards for bathing water next year, there are simple things we can all do to help keep our seas clean. These include disposing of fat, oil and grease in the bin rather than pouring them down the sink or drain and checking that our wastewater pipes are correctly plumbed. Doing this will make an impact on our sewer system and stop Hastings being a pain in the drain. Visit www.southernwater.co.uk/paininthedrain.