Spamalot broke Christmas production record at Brighton Theatre Royal

editorial image
0
Have your say

THEATRE Royal Brighton is celebrating its most successful Christmas season ever.

Spamalot broke all Box Office records for a production over a Christmas period.

In total 25,000 people saw the show, which ended its month-long run on January 14, having received acclaim from audiences and critics alike.

The show repeatedly closed to standing ovations and has has now embarked on a five month tour to 18 venues around the UK.

The success of Spamalot heralds a prosperous year for the 200 year old theatre.

Owners Ambassador Theatre Group have announced a new theatre company, Theatre Royal Brighton Productions, which will present high quality theatre on tour and in the West End.

Christopher Luscombe, has been appointed Artistic Director.

In addition to directing the UK tour of Spamalot, Christopher’s recent credits as director include The Merry Wives of Windsor at Shakespeare’s Globe and When We Are Married in the West End, which received an Olivier Award nomination for Best Revival.

Maria Aitken and Philip Franks have been named Associate Directors.

Theatre Royal Brighton Productions will present three plays in 2012, with each production opening at Theatre Royal Brighton before going on a nationwide tour and then to London.

Howard Panter, joint Chief Executive of Ambassador Theatre Group, commented: “It is well over a decade since Theatre Royal Brighton became part of our group and the Theatre simply goes from strength to strength. The success of Spamalot demonstrates that Brighton audiences will literally come in their thousands to see internationally renowned productions at their local theatre.”

Meanwhile, Theatre Royal Brighton’s Spring season is proving popular with audiences.

Sales are particularly strong for the West End and Broadway sensation Legally Blonde The Musical, which visits Brighton for the first time in March.

Other season highlights include The King’s Speech, the world premiere of David Seidler’s original play.