Teenager revived after rescue from Seaford Beach

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A TEENAGER was brought back to life on the beach after 45 minutes of CPR when he was rescued from the sea.

He was saved by a rescue swimmer from Newhaven Coastguard who bravely battled ten foot waves crashing on to Seaford Beach.

The near tragedy prompted a strong warning about the treacherous undertow which can suck you out into the bay.

A Coastguard spokesperson said: “What many people don’t realise is that as the waves retreat back to the sea they create a large undertow which can very rapidly carry you out to sea, or keep you constantly rolling over like a washing machine.

“This is the second similar incident in the same location within the last two weeks.”

The 18-year-old boy jumped off a concrete groyne on the evening of Thursday June 9 but into difficulties in rough seas. The location was too shallow for Newhaven Lifeboat to get close.

The casualty, who was not local, was not breathing when the rescue swimmer dragged him from the sea.

Members of the team assisted paramedics and heli-med doctors with CPR for 45 minutes, bringing him back to life. He was taken to hospital by ambulance in a serious condition.

Coastguards from Newhaven and Birling Gap, along with Newhaven Lifeboat, Coastguard Helicopter Rescue 104, the Kent Air Ambulance, paramedics and police all played a part in the rescue.

Part of the beach was closed off near the two groynes at Splash Point to allow the emergency workers to help the victim.

Crowds of onlookers gathered to see what was happening and some were offering to go into the sea to help.

A Coastguard spokesperson said: “The sea conditions were horrendous. It was blowing a gale.

“It was quite a complex incident. It’s fantastic that he’s alive.”

South East Coast Ambulance was called to the scene at around 6pm and took him to Eastbourne District General Hospital.

His condition was described as critical but stable. A second teenager was taken to hospital and is understood to have suffered from cold and shock.