Video: Paralympian visits Chailey Heritage

0
Have your say

Multi medal-winning Paralympian Sophie Christiansen visited Chailey Heritage to find out more about the revolutionary new Sparks-funded Petra Running Bike Project.

The benefit of weight-bearing exercise for typically developing children is well known to improve muscle and bone strength.

Triple medal-winning Paralympian Sophie Christansen visits Chailey Heritage to find out more about the Petra Running Bike Project.

Triple medal-winning Paralympian Sophie Christansen visits Chailey Heritage to find out more about the Petra Running Bike Project.

However, children with cerebral palsy who are unable to walk independently often have limited opportunities to participate in weight-bearing exercise. They are more prone to lower limb muscle weakness, which contributes to pain, deformity and functional loss.

Children with cerebral palsy are generally less physically active than their unimpaired peers and so are also at greater risk of

developing secondary conditions such as osteoporosis (reduced bone density).

The Petra Running Bike Project is investigating whether it is a feasible and enjoyable mode of weight-bearing exercise for severely disabled children with cerebral palsy.

The running-bikes have a unique design that supports the child’s posture, enabling non-ambulant children to weight-bear in a supported position and are individually adapted for each child’s requirements.

Equestrian Sophie, 25, who was born with cerebral palsy, has competed in three successive Paralympic Games, winning five gold medals.