Head for heights

A poster from yesteryear
A poster from yesteryear

Here’s another example of the wonderful posters from yesteryear used to attract visitors by train to Sussex resorts and beauty spots.

This illustration by Leslie Carr dates from the 30s and depicts Seaford Head and beginning of the Seven Sisters chain of chalk-faced cliffs.

Seaford Head is the site of a Bronze Age funereal barrow that may well date back as far as 2400BC. There are also faint traces of an Iron Age fort and Romano-British burial ground.

At the time of all this ancient activity, Seaford Head would have been a high hill similar to present-day Firle Beacon and some distance from the seashore.

This is because erosion has been wearing away the coastline hereabouts at an average rate of half a yard a year for millennium.

To boggle the mind still more, geologists say that the Rivers Cuckmere and Ouse have been flowing for at least two million years and have slowly but surely carved out their respective valleys through the South Downs.