Where Oily Annie sold her wares

Ninfield stocks and whipping post. They are beautifully preserved because they are made of iron. It was there in 1790 that a local wife was sold for a half-pint of gin.
Ninfield stocks and whipping post. They are beautifully preserved because they are made of iron. It was there in 1790 that a local wife was sold for a half-pint of gin.

PIC

The village of Ninfield used to house Paraffin Annie, also known as Oily Annie. She used to wheel an old pram around the lanes delivering fuel from door to door.

Annie, real name Alice Terry, lived in Manchester Road, an unlikely street name for a place hardly bigger than a hamlet; but there was a good reason.

It used to be a depot for Lancashire cotton goods, from where they were distributed all along the south coast.

The building also had strong smuggling connections and a secret passage is said to link it with Standard Hill House, a quarter of a mile away.

Standard Hill was by tradition the place where William the Conqueror raised his standard before the Battle of Senlac, a spurious legend which persists in the village sign depicting a Norman knight on

horseback.

Pictured, Ninfield stocks and whipping post. They are beautifully preserved because they are made of iron. It was there in 1790 that a local wife was sold for a half-pint of gin.