A jurassic world was created for Lewes Fossil Festival

Children young and old enjoyed a day of Jurassic discovery at the Lewes Fossil Festival.

The Linklater Pavilion on Railway road was turned into a hub of activity all relating to the era of the dinosaurs.

Sieving for sharks teeth and miniscule fragment of sea creature fossils.

Sieving for sharks teeth and miniscule fragment of sea creature fossils.

Organised by Debby Matthews and a host of volunteers, the event aimed to inform and entertain with a number of activities.

Children were helped by retired teacher Tim Hobbs, to sieve for sharks teeth and miniscule fragment of sea creature fossils.

Travis Chenery, age six travelled from Worthing with his mother.

Rachel Chenery said: “We can’t wait to have a go at the crafts here, Travis loves making things so we thought it would be great to come over.”

Sally Spencer age five and her brother Kit Spencer age 9 made Pterodactyls from recycled ‘junk’.

A host of dinosaur-inspired junk models were on display, showing off the artistic talent in the room.

John Cooper a curator at the Booth Museum in Brighton was on hand to show visitors a fossilised dinosaur toe bone.

Crispin Kirkpatrick and his son Asher age 4, a fossil expert, were given a full explanation of where and how the ancient toe bone came to be just touching distance from them.

Volunteers from the University of the Third Age gave up their Sunday to assist with the activities. Biscuit making was hugely popular as children covered dinosaur shaped shortbread in thick icing and decorations.

Debby Matthews has had a keen interest in fossils which stems form the discovery that she lives in the same house that the world’s first dinosaur hunter, Gideon Mantell did.

In 1822 Dr Mantell found a fossilised tooth in Cuckfield which is recognised as being the first dinosaur fossil found on earth.