A mystery West Sussex man has won £10k a month for a year in the lottery

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A mystery man from West Sussex has won £10,000 a month for a year through the National Lottery’s new ‘set for life’ draw.

The lucky winner, known only as Mr R, won by matching the five main numbers in the draw on Monday, July 1.

He described the win as ‘a perfect amount’ to take the pressure off everyday life and plans to use his winnings to future proof his family.

Andy Carter, senior winners’ advisor at The National Lottery, said: “Huge congratulations to Mr. R for winning this fantastic prize without even touching a ticket.

“After a few simple clicks he can now look forward to receiving £10,000 every month for a year – one thing is for sure, it’ll be a year that he’ll never forget.”

Set For Life is a new draw-based game from The National Lottery.

Players pick five main numbers from one to 47, and one ‘Life Ball’ from one to 10, for the chance to win fixed prizes – with everything from the top prize of £10,000 a month for 30 years, to the 2nd prize of £10,000 a month for one year to £5 for matching just two main numbers.

The Set For Life game costs £1.50 per line and is drawn every Monday and Thursday.

Mr Carter said: “With many people leading busy lives, playing online is becoming increasingly popular.

“It means you can make sure your lucky numbers are always in the draw and your ticket is always checked.

“Playing interactively couldn’t be easier; not only are your numbers checked for you but you are also notified when you have won, receiving the good news via an email that is delivered directly into your inbox.

“Interactive winners have the opportunity to release their name, remain anonymous or like this winner, release some details through partial publicity.”

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