‘Rubbish’ house secures architect prestigious prize

Picture by Brighton Togs/Skye Brackpool -  www.brightontogs.com'07973677017''20140610 Brighton Waste House opening - University of Brighton, Grand Parade Campus, Brighton. 'The Waste House is Britain's first house made almost entirely of rubbish.'The Brighton Waste House, launched in 2012, was endorsed by TV designer and presenter Kevin McCloud who, with University of Brighton lecturer and architect Duncan Baker-Brown, worked on a similar build in London for a TV programme in 2008. SUS-140512-134524001
Picture by Brighton Togs/Skye Brackpool - www.brightontogs.com'07973677017''20140610 Brighton Waste House opening - University of Brighton, Grand Parade Campus, Brighton. 'The Waste House is Britain's first house made almost entirely of rubbish.'The Brighton Waste House, launched in 2012, was endorsed by TV designer and presenter Kevin McCloud who, with University of Brighton lecturer and architect Duncan Baker-Brown, worked on a similar build in London for a TV programme in 2008. SUS-140512-134524001

A house made of rubbish has won a prestigious prize for Lewes architect and lecturer Duncan Baker-Brown at the South Bank Centre in London.

He was awarded the Best Eco Project Working With Schools at the People Environment and Achievement (PEA) for his Brighton Waste House project.

The Brighton Waste House is Europe’s first permanent building made of materials other people have thrown away.

It was completed early in 2014 and was built by more than 300 students from the University of Brighton, and City College Brighton and Hove.

While on site more than 750 local school children visited the building project, including pupils from Ringer Community College, Lewes New School and Lewes Old Grammar.

Materials used to construct the house include thrown-away bricks, ply sheets and off-cut timber from other construction projects, as well as old plastic razors, denim jeans, DVDs and video cassettes, for wall cavity insulation. Old toothbrushes are being used in wall cavities, including over 20,000 of them used once by business class and first class passengers.

Duncan said: “This is an amazing achievement and reflects a tremendous amount of hard work and commitment by many people, university staff and volunteers, students, The Mears Group, City College Brighton and Hove and many contributing companies and organisations.”