VIDEO: Two swans rescued from busy Eastbourne road

The swans appeared to be a couple, according to the casualty manager. Picture: East Sussex Wildlife Rescue and Ambulance Service (WRAS)
The swans appeared to be a couple, according to the casualty manager. Picture: East Sussex Wildlife Rescue and Ambulance Service (WRAS)

A veterinary ambulance rushed to the aid of two swans in Eastbourne on Monday morning (April 2).

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue and Ambulance Service (WRAS) received numerous calls from motorists and members of the public concerned for the welfare of a swan on a busy road.

The swans appeared to be a couple, according to the casualty manager. Picture: East Sussex Wildlife Rescue and Ambulance Service (WRAS)

The swans appeared to be a couple, according to the casualty manager. Picture: East Sussex Wildlife Rescue and Ambulance Service (WRAS)

The service also received a call from Sussex Police and Companion Care Vets relating to a second swan.

The initial reports were of a swan wandering around on the road and grass verge by the Office outlet next to the busy Seaside/Lottbridge Drove roundabout.

Duty rescue co-ordinator Trevor Weeks said: “The situation became very confusing at first when we started receiving conflicting reports as Companion Care Vets phoned saying they had picked one up and taken it had their surgery, then straight after we received another phone call from a worried lady saying she was struggling to keep another swan off the road. This was shortly followed by a call from Sussex Police. In total we received eight calls.”

Rescuer Tony Neads from Polegate was on site within 15 minutes of the first calls and collected the swan from Companion Care Vets and was then diverted straight to the second swan which was quickly rescued and loaded onboard his ambulance.

At WRAS’s Casualty Centre at Whitesmith near Lewes, both swans were checked over by casualty manager Chris Riddington.

He said: “The swan collected from Companion Care Vets has an injury to one leg, but this is not too severe. After giving emergency medication was given the wound was cleaned up. However we noticed that both swans seem very settled and started forming the classic heart shape with their heads and necks as well as chatting to each other like pairs of swans will. As they appeared to be a couple they are being kept together whilst the wound on the one swan recovers which we hope will not be more than three to five days.”

WRAS hopes to release the loves birds back in Eastbourne once fit and well, so they can start preparing for this years nesting season.