Family of Eastbourne man to hold vigil outside Brighton police station 23 years after he died

The family of an Eastbourne man who tragically died following an attack in Brighton 23 years ago is calling for new witnesses to come forward.

The family of an Eastbourne man who tragically died following an attack in Brighton 23 years ago is calling for new witnesses to come forward.

In January 1999, Jay Abatan, 42, died after being the victim of an assault outside the Ocean Rooms in Brighton, alongside his brother Michael – according to his family.

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Two men were arrested and charged in connection with the attack, but the pair were later cleared of charges of affray and assault during a trial.

Jay Abatan SUS-200129-112312001

The family is still appealing for anyone with information to come forward to help find those responsible.

The former Meads resident’s family said they have planned for a vigil to take place by Brighton Police Station in John Street on Saturday, January 29 – 23 years on from Mr Abatan’ death.

The family said the vigil will take place between 2pm–3pm.

A spokesperson from Mr Abatan’s family, who said they believe the attack was ‘racially-motivated’, has called for police to bring those responsible to justice.

Assistant chief constable Nick May had previously said, “Sussex Police has accepted that mistakes were made during the initial investigation into the unlawful killing of Jay Abatan, and regret that nobody has been convicted of this cowardly attack.

“We have apologised publicly for the failings in 1999 but reinforce that current investigative practices are vastly different. We remain committed to investigating any significant new information that will assist in convicting those responsible for Jay’s death.”

• If you have any information about the case, report it online or call 101 quoting Operation Dorchester or use the Major Incident Public Portal.

• Alternatively, you can also contact the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or report online.