Brighton and Hove and Crawley named amongst England’s top 20 STI hotspots

New research has named the top areas in England with the highest STI rates – and Brighton and Hove and Crawley both have the dubious honour of featuring in the top 20 ‘riskiest’ places to have casual sex.

Health experts FROM MARS used Public Health England’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Profiles to find out the diagnostic rates per 100,000 of chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, genital warts, and genital herpes during 2020.

These diagnostic rates are based only on reported cases for each health authority. Not all health authorities may be catching every case, and distortions may occur depending on how cases are reported.

FROM MARS gave each authority a normalized score out of ten for each STI, before taking an average of these scores to create an overall score out of 10, with 10 registering the highest risk of contracting an STI.

New research has named the top areas in England with the highest STI rates  – and Brighton and Hove and Crawley both have the dubious honour of featuring in the top 20 ‘riskiest’ places to have casual sex

Brighton and Hove ranked 13th overall with a score of 9.47 out of 10, while Crawley placed 20th with a rating of 9.01.

The riskiest place to live if you’re worried about catching an STI is South London’s Lambeth. Lambeth had the highest rates per 100,000 for every STI other than genital warts where it ranked second. Lambeth is also 0.01 points off of max points, highlighting just how risky it could be.

With zero cases of syphilis per 100,000 and low diagnostic rates per 100,000, Yorkshire’s Craven ranks as the place with the lowest risk of catching an STI. Craven had an overall score of 0.29 out of 10.

Further findings from the study show Hammersmith & Fulham has the highest number of genital warts cases in the country at 160.20 per 100,000 people, whilst Sheffield has the lowest. Sheffield had 16.5 cases per 100,000 people.

And Mid Sussex has the lowest number of confirmed chlamydia cases in the country. Mid Sussex had 67 cases per 100,000 people during 2020.